Percy Dawson

From BR Bullpen

Henry Dawson

BR Minors page

Biographical Information[edit]

Henry "Percy" Dawson served many roles in professional baseball.

He was a minor league baseball team owner, heading the Richmond Colts (1923-1926) and Portsmouth Truckers, and scout for the New York Yankees. He also served as the head of the Yankees' farm system in the Virginia area.[1] He signed, among others, pitcher Jim Coates.

He managed Richmond in 1925 until June. when his status as the only "bench manager" in the league was deemed to be a failure [2]. He also managed at Raleigh in 1928. He replaced James Viox on May 28, then was replaced by Jacob Edington on July 2.

While owner of Portsmouth, Dawson was involved in a dispute with the Boston Red Sox over future Hall of Fame third baseman Pie Traynor. Red Sox owner Ed Barrow convinced Traynor to join Portsmouth, saying that if the third baseman performed well there, he would join the Red Sox, as the Boston team and Portsmouth had a gentleman's agreement, wherein Portsmouth served as something of a farm team for the Red Sox.

However, the Truckers were still an independent team and, despite the informal agreement, were able to do anything they wished with Traynor, including selling him to another team. In September 1920, they sold him to the Pittsburgh Pirates, infuriating Burrow. "I hit the ceiling. I grabbed the phone and called Dawson and called him everything I could think of," Burrow said. Washington Senators owner Clark Griffith, too, was unhappy, claiming he thought his team would gain access to Traynor.[3]

Incident[edit]

In July 1934, while business and general manager of the Norfolk Tars, Dawson was arrested, along with team manager Bill Skiff and pitcher Ray White, for striking a police officer and resisting arrest during a squabble over a disputed home run call. He was neither fined or imprisoned.

Year-By-Year Managerial Record[edit]

Year Team League Record Finish Organization Playoffs Notes
1925 Richmond Colts Virginia League 31-18 -- None -- Replaced by Guy Lacy (47-36)